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734
1067505
A pair of Japanese six panel screens, Edo period, 19th Century.
A pair of japanese six panel screens, edo period, 19th century.
A pair of japanese six panel screens, edo period, 19th century.
A pair of japanese six panel screens, edo period, 19th century.
A pair of japanese six panel screens, edo period, 19th century.
A pair of japanese six panel screens, edo period, 19th century.
A pair of japanese six panel screens, edo period, 19th century.
A pair of japanese six panel screens, edo period, 19th century.
A pair of japanese six panel screens, edo period, 19th century.
A pair of japanese six panel screens, edo period, 19th century.
A pair of japanese six panel screens, edo period, 19th century.
A pair of japanese six panel screens, edo period, 19th century.
A pair of japanese six panel screens, edo period, 19th century.
A pair of japanese six panel screens, edo period, 19th century.
A pair of japanese six panel screens, edo period, 19th century.

Representing the different seasons. Measurement 176,5x365 cm. Japanese wooden crate accompanies the two screens. Measurement crate/box 28,5x70x184 cm.

Damages, repairs.

Droit de suite: No
Estimate: 

80 000 - 100 000 SEK

7 641 - 9 551 EUR

Hammer price: 
80 000 SEK
Provenance

Purchased in Japan by a Swedish family who lived and worked there for many years.

Related content

There is a long tradition in Asia of screens. The earliest screen paintings in East Asia are examples in lacquer on wood from Six Dynasties China (220-589 AD). Screens were used as diplomatic gifts. ‘From the late medieval period onward. Could also be commissioned by a patron and donated to a temple. Given as gifts to celebrate births, as dowry or to honour someone at a funeral. Many of the screens are unsigned.

There was a marked difference in materials from commission to commission. In the 16th century and onwards, for example, we see a growing preference for extensive application of metal foils, particularly gold.

The first known Japanese folding screen to have been sent to the West was part of a Japanese diplomatic mission to Spain, Portugal and eventually to Rome in the 1580s. As they began to be acquired by museums and major collections in the 19th century, Japanese screens appeared in the work of artists such as Whistler and Manet and have since found their ways in to many homes in the West.

Auction info
Purchasing info
Contact specialist
Cecilia Nordström
Stockholm
Cecilia Nordström
Specialist Asian Ceramics & Works of Art, European Ceramics and Glass
+46 (0)739 40 08 02