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Bukowskis presents LARS NORÉN – THINGS


LARS NORÉN – THINGS

Intro Lars Ring, cultural journalist


Lars Norén has unexpectedly and suddenly passed away. And so his project to write himself into effacement has been thwarted. The intention was, by continuing to incessantly write, to examine how ageing makes words and perspectives disappear. To – in practice – register how memory is erased. Instead, a ruthless silence has suddenly appeared – one that has left the cultural scene almost speechless when faced with the task of connecting with his enormous production.


Lars Norén was a literary giant – IS a giant. His plays will always remain IN THE PRESENT through new performances. The works now live their own lives, increasingly disconnected from the ‘biographical’, from the time when they were birthed and from the moral upset that came to accompany some of them.


The legacy of Lars Norén is great and important. He gave a few generations, born during the late 20th century, a manifest subconscious and a superego revealed. Lars Norén made his precipitous diagnoses in a time when psychoanalysis had become available to all, when time had become a post–capitalist labyrinth filled with a sense of not belonging, and where violence was becoming increasingly anonymous and brutal. He defined the alienation that characterises our time. He wrote me, he wrote us.
Photography Sara Mac Key





” ... mina barn får ta tio femton

saker var när jag dör ...

ett bestämt antal klädesplagg och

sedan sälja resten ... ”

Maria Miesenberger, photograph signed and numbered 3/3 on verso. Estimate 100 000 SEK.


Many people associate Lars Norén with bourgeois quartets, or with his breakthrough plays and their depictions of the family hotel in the southern Swedish village of Genarp. On one level he was deeply marked by this hotel, by its anonymous rooms, constant guests, and the prevailing sense of departure. This is also what his home looked like. The flat on Östermalmsgatan, which I once visited for an interview, was desolate. There was a study, with an electric typewriter with a typeball, on which he, almost compulsively, wrote and rewrote his manuscripts. There was his elegant bicycle, which had been given its own room; another room had one of the iconic Le Corbusier armchairs in it. He was an aesthete when it came to things. Practically all of his interiors were therefore almost symbolically significant. There was only the carefully selected, that which would not hinder his creative flow: the echo of memories, conversations and other literature. The echo of time.


Lars Norén WAS a typewriter. His craft embodied the role of the dramatist and the corrective red pen. His early plays were almost as long as the bible, whereas the later series of ‘Terminal’ plays are short – like spotlights on existential moments. His words were framed by other work, which served as structure and limitation. The inspiration came from a few distinct sources. Aeschylus, in particular his Oresteia with its bloody conflicts between parents and their children; Eugene O’Neill, whose Long Day’s Journey into Night he saw performed at Dramaten in 1956; and Edward Albee, whose marital wrestling matches were based on Strindberg’s work. Beckett represented a true kinship when it came to the sparseness of words in Norén’s later works. And his diaries that became a breathing space, a way of writing himself free of cliques and contexts by going on verbal attacks. A kind of Proustian search for a time that is, yet is also lost, as well as fiction. Filled with literary, subjective truth. A contemporary story of how someone’s mind works.


I am thinking of Lars Norén. I see his study in front of me. I hear the tapping from the typewriter, the silence in between the words. I understand the strong will, whatever the cost, to have integrity. To break free, be unfaithful to the general consensus, and to have the bravery to depict the uncomfortable. The writing follows two parallel lines. The biographical; with the move to Stockholm and the bourgeoisie that he follows to their watering holes – the Swedish archipelago, the Danish west coast or Tuscany. Yet at the same time as he describes these families in detail, their rooted frustrations and the deep traumas that are ruining their lives, he also writes about people that are on the outside of society. Early in his career, Norén wrote about mental hospitals, about victims of the Balkan wars, about the Romani people, about the dispossessed, and about drug abusers. He gives these ‘rejects’ words, background. It is HUMANS that have fallen or been cast out – not a pariah but language. Through the years he has also approached group violence as a mechanism in depictions of what happens in prisons, and in memory of the Holocaust. Relentlessly he circles around that which is truly horrific.
IBM Selectric Typewriter 670X. Estimate 5 000 SEK. A 20th century lacquered metal desk. Estimate 6 000 SEK.


Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret & Charlotte Perriand, "LC4", Cassina, Italien. Estimate 20 000 SEK.



” Trädgården mellan 10 och 13. Sedan sprang jag. Pumpade cyklarna, var tvungen att ta Bianchin. Den är inte bra på grusvägar. ”

A Bianchi road racer bicycle, Italy circa 1980’s. Estimate 5 000 SEK.




” Jag har lyssnat på Maria Callas, Sofia G, en annan ryss, som har skrivit ett stycke som heter Styx, Beethovens andra och sjunde symfoni och en del annat. Håller på att lyssna igenom hela min cd–samling. Det tar flera år. ”

The complete music collection of Lars Norén, circa 480 pieces. Estimate 5 000 SEK.



Lars Norén was controversial. He wrote the play 7:3 for a group of prisoners, of which a few later went on to commit terrible crimes. The intention was to candidly describe the racism and Nazism that is spreading in our detention centres. To force the audience into taking a stand. Depicting reality should never result in wanting to blame the messenger. Norén allowed us to come face to face with destitution, with violence, but above all, allowed us to understand what had happened. Plays such as Kyla – about the murder of the teenage boy John Hron – and 20 November – depicting how a young man becomes a terrorist – are brutally affecting.


He was one of the great Europeans. Just how significant he was, we have probably yet to fully understand. The Norénian landscape moves between the seemingly idyllic and the abysses of the soul. Again and again, he pulls the rug out from under our feet, with his sudden, absurd gallows humour. A text by Norén is always a minefield.


Lars Norén has exited time, but his texts remain timeless. Many of the plays have only been performed once. Some have never been performed. It is time to freely interpret his dramas, perhaps more loaded than the usual Swedish psychological realism. Now the future will mourn, analyse, and write dissertations. Like Strindberg, his language has an incredible energy that stops for nothing. Like Bergman he battles, not with God, but with the beast within us all. He wrote to find the pain, to find truths untainted with the lies of language. Now we will sit on his chairs, think about why he came to love concrete, and be unnerved by all his depictions of the hells we create for each other. A lot remains to be done. Lars Norén is not finished with us yet.


When is the viewing & auction?
Viewing 13 — 17 October, Berzelii Park 1, Stockholm.
Online auction 8 – 17 October.
Catalogue online 8 October.


Lars Norén, typewritten and handwritten note. One sheet A4, double sided. Estimate 1 500 SEK.


Bid on the objects


A 20th century lacquered metal desk.
Hammer price 
27 200 SEK
Estimate 
6 000 SEK
Lars Valinger, a concrete shelf, second half of the 20th century.
Hammer price 
10 000 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
Tablelamp, 'Tangola', Habitat, China.
Hammer price 
2 400 SEK
Estimate 
500 SEK
A contemporary patinated metal cabinet.
Hammer price 
17 500 SEK
Estimate 
6 000 SEK
A Bianchi road racer bicyle, Italy 1973-74.
Hammer price 
37 500 SEK
Estimate 
5 000 SEK
Lars Norén, typewritten and handwritten note.
Hammer price 
18 100 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
An industrial stool, 20th Century.
Hammer price 
8 200 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
A pair of 'Frankfurt chairs' by Helmut Starke.
Hammer price 
5 600 SEK
Estimate 
800 SEK
A 'Semana Chair No. 501' chair by David Weeks, Habitat.
Hammer price 
7 400 SEK
Estimate 
4 000 SEK
Broste Copenhagen, daybed, Denmark.
Hammer price 
9 300 SEK
Estimate 
5 000 SEK
A wooden daybed, South East Asia.
Hammer price 
6 200 SEK
Estimate 
4 000 SEK
An early 20th century deck chair.
Hammer price 
3 200 SEK
Estimate 
2 500 SEK
Deck chair, possibly China, 20th century.
Hammer price 
8 700 SEK
Estimate 
3 000 SEK
A concrete contemporary table from R.O.O.M.
Hammer price 
14 500 SEK
Estimate 
5 000 SEK
Maria Miesenberger, photograph signed and numbered 3/3 on verso.
Hammer price 
136 000 SEK
Estimate 
100 000 SEK
Cato Lein, photograph, 3 pcs.
Hammer price 
8 300 SEK
Estimate 
2 500 SEK
A lounge chair, mid-20th century.
Hammer price 
2 923 SEK
Estimate 
2 500 SEK
A zinc tub.
Hammer price 
4 200 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
A pair of contemporary concrete flower pots.
Hammer price 
1 500 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
A pair of conpemporary concrete flower pots.
Hammer price 
1 600 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
A contemporary concrete flowerpot.
Hammer price 
3 600 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
Unknown artist, a paper sculpture, signed.
Hammer price 
8 400 SEK
Estimate 
2 000 SEK
Peter Tillberg, charcoal on paper, signed.
Hammer price 
17 200 SEK
Estimate 
4 000 SEK
"Dödens Nyheter", nr 1, 1979.
Hammer price 
2 000 SEK
Estimate 
800 SEK
Geneviève Naylor, photograph signed on verso.
Hammer price 
9 000 SEK
Estimate 
2 500 SEK
Tintin, comic books, 6 pcs, Hergé.
Hammer price 
7 200 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
Exhibition posters, 4 pcs.
Hammer price 
3 400 SEK
Estimate 
500 SEK
The complete music collection of Lars Norén, circa 480 pieces.
Hammer price 
38 000 SEK
Estimate 
5 000 SEK
Album with 9 pcs Chinese inkstones, 20th century.
Hammer price 
4 000 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
Ann-Charlotte Ohlén, oil on canvas, signed.
Hammer price 
39 000 SEK
Estimate 
2 000 SEK
A 20th century patinated metal changing room cabinet.
Hammer price 
18 500 SEK
Estimate 
6 000 SEK
A 21st century IKEA large porcelain serving dish.
Hammer price 
2 400 SEK
Estimate 
800 SEK
Peter Tillberg, watercolor on paper, signed and dated 1974.
Hammer price 
17 500 SEK
Estimate 
4 000 SEK
Theater posters, 3 pcs, Lars Norén.
Hammer price 
4 300 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
Theater posters, 3 pcs, Lars Norén.
Hammer price 
2 700 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
Theater posters, 3 pcs, Lars Norén.
Hammer price 
1 800 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
Theater posters, 4 pcs, Lars Norén.
Hammer price 
2 500 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
Theater posters, 3 pcs, Lars Norén.
Hammer price 
2 000 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
Photograph, 16 pcs, unknown artist.
Hammer price 
2 400 SEK
Estimate 
800 SEK
Photograph, 5 pcs, unknown artist.
Hammer price 
3 900 SEK
Estimate 
800 SEK
Theater posters, 3 pcs, Lars Norén and others.
Hammer price 
3 000 SEK
Estimate 
800 SEK
Tom Benson, photograph with copyright stamp on verso.
Hammer price 
25 000 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
Patrik Gunnar Helin, photograph, 3 pcs.
Hammer price 
13 000 SEK
Estimate 
5 000 SEK
Inger Hammarstedt, photography.
Hammer price 
6 600 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
Unknown artist, photograph, signed Per Matz, 2008.
Hammer price 
4 700 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
Oliver Mark, photograph with copyright stamp on verso.
Hammer price 
7 000 SEK
Estimate 
3 000 SEK
Unknown artist, photograph, 2 pcs.
Hammer price 
6 600 SEK
Estimate 
2 500 SEK
Theater poster, Lars Norén, signed.
Hammer price 
4 700 SEK
Estimate 
1 500 SEK
Poster, Lars Norén, "Väcker dramatiken.", DN.
Hammer price 
2 400 SEK
Estimate 
800 SEK
A contemporary wall shelf.
Hammer price 
9 600 SEK
Estimate 
3 000 SEK
Three 20th century wooden frames.
Hammer price 
2 400 SEK
Estimate 
500 SEK
A pair of contemporary sideboards.
Hammer price 
8 500 SEK
Estimate 
2 000 SEK
A concrete dining table, contemporary production.
Hammer price 
6 800 SEK
Estimate 
4 000 SEK
A contemporary wardrobe.
Hammer price 
7 200 SEK
Estimate 
6 000 SEK
A contemporary ceiling light.
Hammer price 
3 800 SEK
Estimate 
3 000 SEK


For more information regarding the upcoming auction Contact category specialist


Björn Extergren
Stockholm
Björn Extergren
Head of Consignment & Sales Department, Fine Art Stockholm. Specialist Antique Furniture, Decorative Arts and Asian Ceramics
+46 (0)706 40 28 61
Andreas Rydén
Stockholm
Andreas Rydén
Head Specialist, Art, Deputy Managing Director
+46 (0)728 58 71 39
Eva Seeman
Stockholm
Eva Seeman
Head Specialist Design and 20th-21st C Works of Art
+46 (0)708 92 19 69
Sara Bourke
Stockholm
Sara Bourke
PR & Brand Director
+46 (0) 739 400 826